First attempt at growing oyster mushrooms.

My first mushroom bed.

Mushroom Bed

Mushroom Bed

Date of spreading spawn: April 13th 2021.

I bought the spawn from Serbia on ebay.

I don’t have any idea so I have followed the websites recommended by Baruch

A very good website is :
https://grocycle.com/

A good place to buy spawn is here
https://gluckspilze.com/

Many mushroom growing websites show you how to grow mushrooms outside. Once the mycelium has become well established it is possible to grow mushrooms for years.
I very much like this simple way of growing mushrooms.

I have used the lasagna method of layering the substrate and spawn.
I have used Encina (Holm Oak) leaves in various states of decomposition.

The area is very shady and happens to have an irrigation tube going past.
I used about 250 grams of spawn on about 80cm squared.

The area will be irrigated every night.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vegetarian Vegan Tofu Sausages

vegetarian vegan tofu sausages

VEGETARIAN VEGAN TOFU SAUSAGES

These vegetarian vegan tofu sausages are really tasty and easy to make and they can be prepared in minutes. They are made with tofu and rolled oats and flavoured with sage, onion, Marmite and soy sauce.

vegetarian vegan tofu sausages

Vegetarian Vegan Tofu Sausages

In this recipe, you blitz up some tofu, onion and garlic and then mix with some fried onions and sage and rolled oats..

INGREDIENTS

  • 200g block of firm tofu, cut into chunks
  • 1 small onion, roughly chopped
  • 3 large cloves garlic, crushed
  • a large onion
  • a handful of sage leaves, finely chopped1/4 teaspoon chilli powder
  • 1 1/2 cups rolled oats
  • 2 teaspoons Marmite
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • ½ teaspoon salt

METHOD

  1. Roughly chop the large onion.
  2. Put the onion into the bowl of a food processor and pulse so that it is finely chopped.
  3. Heat some extra virgin olive oil in a frying pan and add the chopped onion.
  4. Season the onion with salt and pepper, and fry gently until soft.
  5. Stir in the chopped sage and mix well.
  6. Remove from the heat after another couple of minutes.
  7. Add the tofu, garlic, Marmite, soy sauce to the food processor and blitz until smooth.
  8. Transfer to a bowl and add the rolled oats, fried onion and salt.
  9. Mix well and leave for at last 30 minutes to allow flavours to develop and the oats to soften.
  10. Divide the mixture into 8 balls of about 80g each.
  11. Wet your hands and roll out the balls into sausage shapes.
  12. Put on a plate and keep in the fridge until you are ready to fry them.
  13. Heat some extra virgin olive oil in a frying pan.
  14. Fry the sausages for a couple of minutes on each side, turning so that they brown all over.

vegetarian vegan tofu sausages

vegetarian vegan tofu sausages

vegetarian vegan tofu sausages

vegetarian vegan tofu sausages

vegetarian vegan tofu sausages

Hake and Chorizo with White Beans

cortijoblog fried potato cake

HAKE AND CHORIZO WITH WHITE BEANS

If you are using dried white beans, this recipe can be cooked in a pressure cooker and it will take about 30 minutes. Alternatively, you can use canned beans and cook it on the stove top. This recipe works well with any type of white fish such as hake or cod. You can replace the dried cabbage with fresh, chopped cabbage.

fried potato cake

 Hake and Chorizo with White Beans

This fish dish can be easily and quickly prepared in a pressure cooker.

INGREDIENTS

  • 200g dried white beans, soaked for 24-48 hours
  • 80g spicy Spanish dried chorizo, thinly sliced
  • 1 medium onion, roughly chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, finely chopped1 glass red wine
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 2 hake fillets
  • 2 teaspoons dried oregano
  • 2 tablespoons concentrated tomato sauce
  • extra virgin olive oil
  • salt and pepper

METHOD

  1. Put the beans in a pressure cooker, cover with water and cook for 15 minutes.
  2. Quick release the pressure and drain the beans.
  3. Heat some olive oil in the pressure cooker.
  4. Gently fry the onion until soft.
  5. Add the chorizo and fry for another couple of minutes.
  6. Fry the garlic for 30 seconds or so.
  7. Add all the other ingredients and the beans but not the fish to the pan.
  8. Mix well and season with salt and pepper.
  9. Pour over a cup of water and bring to the boil.
  10. Cover the pressure cooker and bring up to pressure.
  11. Turn down the heat and simmer for 10 minutes.
  12. Turn off the heat and leave for 5 minutes.
  13. Release the pressure and open the cooker.
  14. Check that the beans are cooked.
  15. Lay the fish on the top.
  16. Put back on a low heat.
  17. Cover and leave for 10-15 minutes.
  18. Serve.

Silver Broom – Adenocarpus decorticans

Silver Broom – Adenocarpus decorticans

It is April and there is lots of Silver Broom – Adenocarpus decorticans around the surrounding hills. It grows in full sun and shady places.  It is  monoecious having both  male and female reproductive organs in the same individual i.e.  hermaphrodite. Pollination is crossed (it occurs between different plants and not between flowers on  a single plant) . Pollination is and aided by insects (entomophil).  The seeds are in pods and are spread by explosive force when the seed pod dries. It is related to the sweet pea.

Adenocarpus decorticans

Adenocarpus decorticans

This plant is very attractive and I intend to grow some from seed.

The meaning of the name:
Adeno = relating to a gland or glands
Carpus = fruited.
Decorticans = is derived from the Latin word decorticans meaning “without bark” referring to the peeling bark on the smaller branches.

Silver Broom

Silver Broom

This is about 2 weeks before full blooming. It is very spectacular against a blue sky.  This is a wild bush and it tolerates extreme heat (35C)  and dryness in the summer and very cold temperatures in the winter. (-15C)

The Spanish name for this plant is Rascavieja

Sprouting Mung Beans using a teapot

 I’d tried to sprout mung beans before in the past using a jam jar and some cloth over the top but had never had much luck so when I saw a post by Angie Jee on the Good Food Together Facebook page describing her method using a teapot, I thought I’d give it another go. The beauty of Angie’s teapot method is that you can easily rinse the sprouts once or twice a day by draining the water off through the spout, the teapot doesn’t take up much space on the worktop, and it’s where you can see it so you don’t forget about it.Although a spout with a mesh might be better during the initial stages of rinsing and draining the beans, I found that the one I had without a mesh worked perfectly as at the end of the process, the green skins float to the top and you can separate these from the sprouts which sink to the bottom.

Here’s Angie’s method.

  • Weigh out 50g of mung beans into a teapot.
  • Pour over some boiling water and leave for 60 seconds to kill any bacteria.
  • Drain off the hot water and rinse with cold water.
  • Cover the beans with water and leave for 24 hours.
  • Rinse the beans with fresh, cold water and drain off any surplus water.
  • Leave for another 24 hours and then repeat the rinse/drain process.

You can rinse and drain twice a day if you like.

The bean sprouts will be ready after about 4 days.

You can then store them in a bowl in the fridge until you need them.