Hummus

Hummus
Serves 4
This is an adaptation of a recipe for hummus by Felicity Cloake from her series "How to make perfect ..." I found it tastes delicious without the bicarbonate of soda and just put all the ingredients in the blender. The word "Hummus" originates from the Arabic for chickpeas. Traditionally an Eastern Mediterranean dip, there are as many recipes for this dip as there are ways of spelling it. It can be served with pitta bread, flatbreads or crudité or as an accompaniment to a meal.
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Ingredients
  1. 200g dried chickpeas
  2. 6 tablespoons tahini
  3. Juice of 1 or 2 lemons
  4. 3-5 cloves garlic, crushed
  5. Pinch of cumin
  6. Salt, to taste
  7. Olive oil, to top
  8. Paprika
Instructions
  1. Soak the chickpeas in water for 24 hours.
  2. Don't rinse the chickpeas but cook them in their soaking water in a pressure cooker 30 minutes.
  3. Quick release the pressure and remove the lid. Leave to cool in the cooking liquid.
  4. Transfer the chickpeas with a draining spoon to the blender bowl, reserving the cooking liquid.
  5. Add all the other ingredients and blend well. Add some of the cooking liquid and blend to form a smooth paste.
  6. Taste for salt, garlic and lemon juice, adding more as and if necessary.
  7. Sprinkle top with sweet paprika and drizzle over some olive oil.
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Chickpea courgette mash

Chickpea courgette mash

chickpea and courgette mash

Chickpea and courgette mash

This recipe for chickpea courgette mash is made with the same ingredients as those used in hummus: chickpeas, garlic, tahini and lemon juice as well as the courgettes. Inspiration for it came from the courgette hummus recipe.

The important thing about growing and harvesting courgettes is to pick them when they are small before they get too big. My favourite way of preparing courgettes is to thickly slice the courgettes and then slowly fry them in a splash of olive oil before dressing with salt, black pepper, a squeeze of lemon juice and a knob of butter.

Courgettes or zucchini are low in calories and contain folate, potassium and Vitamin A. They are extremely flexible and can be prepared and eaten in many different ways (raw, boiled, fried, roast or barbecued). Interestingly enough, there is no difference between a courgette and the larger marrow, it’s simply that courgettes are harvested earlier while marrows are left to grow larger. That said, however, some species taste better as courgettes while others taste better as marrows.

In the summer when courgette production is in full swing, it’s good to find new ways of cooking courgettes. For more recipes for courgettes, check out this recipe book on Amazon: What Will I Do with All Those Courgettes?

INGREDIENTS:
courgettes, cut into 1cm cubes
400g cooked chickpeas
1 tablespoon tahini
3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
juice of 1/2 lemon
1 teaspoon cumin
olive oil
salt and pepper

METHOD:
To make the chickpea courgette mash, heat some olive oil in a frying pan and add the cubed courgette. Fry gently until they have lost all their liquid and are almost starting to brown.

Add the chickpeas, garlic and cumin and stir well for a minute or so. Stir in the tahini and lemon juice and season with salt and pepper. Heat through.

Remove half of the mixture to a bowl and blend with a stick blender. Pour back into the frying pan.

The idea is to evaporate some, most or all of the liquid depending on how dry you want it. I like to make it fairly dry so that it browns as you continue frying it.